Jesus’ Ministry along the Sea of Galilee

It is often said that big things come in small packages. The truth of this saying is no more clearly displayed than in the ministry of Jesus along the shores of the Sea of Galilee. By the time Jesus moved from his hometown of Nazareth to the town of Capernaum, the freshwater Sea of Galilee boasted a thriving fishing industry, and several of those Jesus would eventually choose as his disciples were fishermen (Matthew 4:12-22; Mark 1:16-20; Luke 5:1-11). And though this small lake spanned a mere seven miles at its widest point from east to west, a significant number of events in Jesus’ ministry took place along its shores–or sometimes even on the lake itself. One of these events–the feeding of 5000 people–took place near the town of Bethsaida (Matthew 14:13-21; Mark 6:30-44; Luke 9:10-17; John 6:1-15), which was also the hometown of Peter, Andrew, and Philip (John 1:44; 12:21). The exact location of this town is still being debated, with some scholars favoring the site of et-Tell and others favoring the site of el-Araj. Other notable events along the lake include Jesus walking on the water (Matthew 14:22-36; Mark 6:45-53; Luke 6:16-21), calming the wind and the waves (Matthew 8:23-27; Mark 4:35-41), and teaching people in parables and sermons. Jesus’ most famous sermon (Matthew 5-7) was likely delivered at a place now called the Mount of Beatitudes. On another occasion Jesus taught from a boat on the lake while people listened along the shore (Mark 4:1). This may have happened at a place called the Cove of the Sower, which was a naturally occurring outdoor amphitheater in which the lake itself formed the stage.

download hi-res file

Western Europe and Africa

To the ancient Israelites, the distant regions of western Europe and Africa would have been regarded as the edge of the world, for beyond the Strait of Gibraltar and the coasts of Spain lay the vast, impassable Atlantic Ocean. Some scholars speculate that Tarshish, mentioned throughout the Old Testament as a far off land (Genesis 10:4; 1 Kings 10:14-25; 22:48; 2 Chronicles 9:21; Psalm 72:10; Isaiah 23; 60:9; 66:19; Jeremiah 10:9; Ezekiel 27; 38:13; Jonah 1:3), may have been located somewhere in these regions, perhaps Tartessos in Spain or one of the large Mediterranean islands. Throughout ancient times the empires of Carthage and Greece competed for the islands and coasts of the western Medterrenaean Sea until the growing Roman Empire seized the entire region by the end of the Punic Wars in 146 B.C. The Romans likewise captured the region of Gaul by about 50 B.C. and firmly established themselves as the uncontested power in the western Mediterranean. During the New Testament, the apostle Paul wrote to the believers in Rome and spoke of his desire to visit them on his way to Spain (Romans 15:23-29). It is not clear from Paul’s later letters if his intentions were ever fulfilled, although church tradition holds that they were.

download hi-res file

The Battle at the Valley of Siddim

Genesis 14

The battle at the Valley of Siddim took place before the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were famously destroyed for their wickedness. At that time these cities, along with Bela (Zoar), Admah, and Zeboiim, had been subject to king Kedorlaomer of Babylonia for twelve years, but in the thirteenth year they rebelled. So Kedorlaomer and three of his allies marched to the region and subdued Ashtaroth, Ham, Kiriathaim, Seir, El-paran (perhaps ancient Elath), En-mishpat (Kadesh-barnea), Amalek, and Hazazon-tamar (which was En-gedi; see 2 Chronicles 20:2), and then they advanced to the Valley of Siddim, which was likely the dry southern basin of the Dead Sea. There the forces of Sodom, Gomorrah, Bela, Admah, and Zeboiim met them in battle but were routed. As some of the men of the five cities fled across the valley, they fell into tar pits (or perhaps slime pits), while others escaped into the mountains. The four allied kings then looted Sodom and Gomorrah and captured Lot before returning to Mesopotamia by way of Dan in the far north. One of Lot’s men escaped and reported this news to Abram at Mamre, near the town of Hebron, and Abram quickly mustered 318 trained men from his household to pursue the four kings. He and his allies caught up with them at Dan and attacked, chasing them beyond Damascus and recovering Lot and his possessions along with the other captives. After Abram returned, the priest-king Melchizedek of Salem (probably Jerusalem) pronounced a blessing over Abram and gave his allies a portion of the recovered goods.

download hi-res file

Lycia and Pamphylia

Throughout their long history, the mountainous region of Lycia and the fertile plain of Pamphylia repeatedly changed hands among the dominant powers of Anatolia. During the Trojan War, Lycia was allied with the Trojans, and Pamphylia belonged to the Hittite Empire. Later, various Greek powers held sway over Lycia and Pamphylia until Cyrus the Great of Persia subdued the entire region. After Alexander the Great wrested the region from Persia, Lycia and Pamphylia were once again fought over by various powers, including the Ptolemies, the Seleucids, and the Rhodians. As time went on, Pamphylia became a haunt for pirates, but after Lycia and Pamphylia came under Roman control the region enjoyed greater security. It was also during this time that the cities of Lycia formed the Lycian League, the earliest known democratic union of city-states, which was headquartered at Patara. Even after the Romans took control over the region, the Lycian League was allowed to exercise some degree of autonomous rule. During New Testament times, the apostle Paul passed through Perga as he made his way to Antioch of Pisidia and also as he returned. From there he went to Attalia before setting sail for Antioch (Acts 13-14). Near the end of his third missionary journey, Paul changed ships at the port of Patara on his way to Jerusalem (Acts 21:1-2). Later, Paul changed ships at the port of Myra while being transferred to Rome to stand trial before Caesar (Acts 27:5). Myra is also the hometown of St. Nicholas, the fourth-century Christian bishop who became widely associated with gift-giving and Christmas.

download hi-res file

The Nation of Moab and the Tribe of Reuben

Throughout the Old Testament, the land immediately east of the Dead Sea was home to the nation of Moab and also to the Israelite tribe of Reuben. The Moabites were distantly related to the Israelites through Abraham’s nephew Lot (Genesis 19), and as the Israelites made their way to the Promised Land under Moses’ leadership, they had to pass by Moab’s territory (Numbers 21:10-20; Deuteronomy 2:1-23), but they were not to take anything that belonged to them. After the Israelites defeated Og and Sihon, the tribe of Reuben was granted an inheritance of land east of the Jordan River immediately north of Moab. At times Israel’s relationship with the Moabites was peaceful, such as when Naomi and her family moved to Moab to escape famine in Judah (Ruth 1:1). Likewise, David (Naomi’s great-grandson) placed his parents in the care of the king of Moab while fleeing from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4). Other times, however, the Israelites fought against the Moabites (Judges 3:12-30; 2 Samuel 8:1-2; 2 Kings 3; 1 Chronicles 18:1-2; 2 Chronicles 20), and eventually David subjugated them (2 Samuel 8:1-2). But sometime around 852 B.C., King Mesha of Moab reestablished his nation’s independence and expanded its borders northward to include all the territory of Reuben (2 Kings 1:1; 3; 8:20-22; 2 Chronicles 21:8-10), which had belonged to Moab before Sihon seized it (Numbers 21:26). This lost territory would remain under the control of various foreign rulers for another 700 years until the time of the Maccabees.

download hi-res file